Tag: retrotisements

For Valentine’s Day, Give the Gift of… Peas?

For Valentine’s Day, Give the Gift of… Peas?

Retrotisements
I guess you can now cross "everything" off the list of things I have not seen, because Valentine's Day was apparently used to sell canned peas. Behold this Green Giant ad from 1952. Yikes. Well this one's definitely going in the Valentine's Day section of the Retrotisements gallery, so if you want to see an even larger version of this advertisement then head over there now.
Retrotisements: Sanka Coffee Edition

Retrotisements: Sanka Coffee Edition

Retrotisements
I've been known to enjoy some decaffeinated coffee from time to time, but I just can't see making it a regular thing. But for those who love the taste but can't handle the buzz, I guess it's good Sanka is around. The Sanka brand came out of France in the early 20th century, and its name is derived from the French words for "without caffeine," or "sans caféine." As history tells it, the credit for decaf goes to a team of German researchers led by Ludwig Roselius. In 1914, Roselius founded his own company, called Kaffee Hag Corporation, in New York. When Kaffee Hag was confiscated during World War I -- sorry, Germans! -- and sold to an American firm, Roselius lost not only his company, but also the American trademark rights to the name. To re-establish his product, he began to use the
You Know You Want This Styx Van from 1979, So Don’t Pretend Otherwise

You Know You Want This Styx Van from 1979, So Don’t Pretend Otherwise

Retrotisements
Straight out of a Billboard magazine issue from February 1979 comes this groovy beauty: Laugh all you want, but this made total sense in '79. Styx was huge at the time, having released the successful Pieces of Eight album in September 1978. It was one in a string of multi-platinum records for the band. So who wouldn't want to rock the paradise with a painted Styx van featuring album art from Pieces of Eight and The Grand Illusion? I'd like one of the tour jackets too, please. Hell, I'd drive one of those bad boys around today. You can keep the Betamax player though.
Ads from the Open Road, Volume 1

Ads from the Open Road, Volume 1

Retrotisements
I don't really pay much attention to billboard advertisements while I'm driving, unless it's something fairly snappy or unique. And as much as I'd like to romanticize old billboard ads, I think the medium as a whole has been fairly bereft of great ideas. And if you think about it, it makes sense. You're only going to see a billboard ad clearly for what, four or five seconds? So it's all about economy of ideas and design. Anything too complicated and you either lose a driver's interest or cause a 20-car pileup. Neither is good for business. I'm not holding this group of classic billboard ads up as the best ever, but I think you'll enjoy them nonetheless. These are all courtesy the Duke University Libraries Digital Collections advertising series. I can't decide which part of...
The Best of the Man in the Gray Flannel Suit — 2012

The Best of the Man in the Gray Flannel Suit — 2012

Blogstuff
So, 2012. It sure was twelve months, wasn't it? But before the year slips away into 2013, let's take a moment to reflect on just some of the awesome content I've published in Aught 12, as ranked by the number of visits (which I'm aware don't always equate to quality, but that's another topic). For reference, here's last year's review. And as always, I offer a laurel and hearty handshake to everyone who has stopped by this year -- either on the blog, the Facebook page, or any of the ever-growing venues where I waste my time and yours. This site racked up about half a million visits in 2012, which I'm fairly certain is an all-time high. It's probably all downhill from here. Oh and I'd be remiss if I didn't point out the lovely selection of Featured Posts you see to the right. It ma...
Great Moments in Comic Book Advertising, Vol. 1

Great Moments in Comic Book Advertising, Vol. 1

Advertising, Retrotisements
In which I explore some of the best -- and worst -- advertisements from vintage comic books. Today's ad comes from Beware #5 (September 1953), published by Trojan Magazines, and boldly declares, "Fat folks! Your dream has come true!" Now, I have some questions about this. What the hell is a Meltab? Are people really desperate enough to buy a weight loss remedy from an ad in a comic book. Why does the guy in the boxer shorts look like he's suffering from elephantiasis of the bladder, and how will Meltabs help him? But most importantly, who at this Robin Products Company thought that their target market -- and it's clearly women -- would be reading a kids' horror comic book featuring a werewolf on the cover? Related articles Comic Book Wallpaper: Witches Tales #2 (neatocoolvil

RIP Hostess and Twinkie the Kid

Retrotisements
Could this be the end of the line for Hostess and its many iconic brands? Having already emerged from bankruptcy in 2004, it looks like a second filing and an employee strike will finally do them in. I really don't eat any of their stuff anymore, but it's still a damn shame. Here's a partial list of Hostess brands as of 2012: Baker's Inn Beefsteak Blue Ribbon Butternut Breads Colombo Cotton’s Drake's Dolly Madison Dutch Hearth Eddy’s Good Hearth Home Pride Hostess Nature's Pride Toscana Wonder Bread Sigh. Oh well, life goes on I guess. But before we say our final goodbyes, let's look at this neat old Hostess ad from 1956, featuring their cup cakes, Sno-Balls, and of course Twinkies. Related articles Hostess, maker of Twinkies, closing business
Mr. Potato Head Was One Realistic Spud-Based Toy

Mr. Potato Head Was One Realistic Spud-Based Toy

Retrotisements
I've only ever known the smooth, fully plastic Mr. Potato Head toy, so it blows my mind a little bit to know that Hasbro originally produced what was quite literally just plastic body parts that you stuck on a real spud. Witness this ad from 1954: I mean, look at that thing. People bash the Pet Rock, but this thing is about half a step above that. Maybe if the Pet Rock had good accessories and you could stick it on a plastic body we'd remember it more fondly. Fun trivia: On April 30, 1952, Mr. Potato Head became the first toy advertised on television. Here's a vintage example of an early ad.