Friday, April 3
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Tag: Robert Fripp

Listening Booth – David Sylvian & Robert Fripp, “Jean the Birdman”

Listening Booth – David Sylvian & Robert Fripp, “Jean the Birdman”

Listening Booth, Music
When he wanted to put together yet another version of King Crimson in the early 1990s, Robert Fripp reached out to Japan co-founder David Sylvian.  Sylvian passed at the opportunity, but the pair went ahead released a studio album in 1993 anyway.  This is the best cut from that album -- "Jean the Birdman".  It's a bit goofy, but the song more than makes up for it. So given that this video was produced in '93, how do you think it fared on MTV?
Gray Flannel Mixtape: The mellow side of prog

Gray Flannel Mixtape: The mellow side of prog

Music
To no one's surprise, last year's round of Rock and Roll Hall of Fame inductees included not one progressive rock act.  This despite the millions of albums sold, the countless musicians inspired, and the long-lasting impact of the genre's best.  Hell, can anyone under 50 even name two Dave Clark Five songs?  Yeah, me neither. But to be fair, I can understand why someone not very familiar with prog rock might be inclined to write it off as so much boring instrumental wankery and bastardized classical music pastiches.  But to paint an endlessly rich style of music with such a broad brush is not only lazy, it's downright inaccurate.  So to show that prog ain't all clinical sweep arpeggios and no heart, I've put together a mixtape to showcase the gentler side of the genre. What we've got
2nd Chance Album Review – The Cheerful Insanity of Giles, Giles & Fripp

2nd Chance Album Review – The Cheerful Insanity of Giles, Giles & Fripp

Music
Just one year before prog-rock titans King Crimson released their first album, two-thirds of that band released their first and last studio album as the erstwhile trio of Giles, Giles & Fripp — guitarist Robert Fripp, Peter Giles on bass and brother Michael on drums. Released in 1968, during the height of the Psychedelic era, The Cheerful Insanity of Giles, Giles & Fripp promptly sank into oblivion. But believe me, it's worth revisiting. If I had to surmise a reason why this album tanked, I'd say its oddly eclectic songs are a contributing factor. The album has a generous dose of cheeky, Kinks/Pythonesque humor, but most of the acts of the day were practicing a much darker and substantive form of psychedelia. Had this album been released even a year or 18 months earlier, it