Tag: Sears Catalog Goodness

Sears Catalog Goodness #3: Late ’70s Exercise Equipment

Sears Catalog Goodness #3: Late ’70s Exercise Equipment

Ephemera
I know that making fun of 1970s fashion is an easy thing to do, and I certainly enjoy a good bell-bottom or earth tone joke as much as the next guy. But one thing that gets overlooked in '70s jokes is how primitive the home exercise equipment of that time looks compared to now. To illustrate, here are three pages from the Fall 1977 Sears catalog that showcase home workout equipment made up of approximately 86.3% pipes and belts. Let's get physical!
Sears Catalog Goodness #2: Fall 1958 Halloween Costumes

Sears Catalog Goodness #2: Fall 1958 Halloween Costumes

Ephemera
In Sears Catalog Goodness I pull one page from a vintage Sears catalog to highlight neat, interesting, or just plain funny images and products sold by one of America’s greatest retailers once upon a time. You knew I couldn't go the whole Halloween season without sharing some vintage costumes from Sears, right? Well I'm not about to disappoint you on that front, so here is a page from the Fall 1958 catalog featuring the biggest heroes and stars of the day -- Zorro, Superman, Lassie, Woody Woodpecker, Casper the Friendly Ghost, Bugs Bunny, and "Pop-Eye the Sailor Man." The name characters on this page are great, of course, but my eye is drawn toward the costume that probably dates this assortment more than any other -- Satellite Joe, the "man of tomorrow." If that doesn't screa
Sears Catalog Goodness #1: Roy Rogers/Dale Evans Cowboy & Cowgirl Outfits, 1957

Sears Catalog Goodness #1: Roy Rogers/Dale Evans Cowboy & Cowgirl Outfits, 1957

Ephemera
In Sears Catalog Goodness I pull one page from a vintage Sears catalog to highlight neat, interesting, or just plain funny images and products sold by one of America's greatest retailers once upon a time. From the 1957 Sears Christmas catalog we have what look like Halloween costumes but are absolutely not. If you were a kid in the 1950s then I don't have to tell you how large the whole Western genre loomed in American pop culture. In particular, two of its biggest stars were Roy Rogers and Dale Evans, whose career began in the 1930s and spanned decades. Given that, it was not at all strange for boys and girls to dress like cowboys and cowgirls just because. It didn't even need to be Halloween. I suppose the closest thing we have to that now is when little girls dress like...