Tag: singles

Listening Booth — Fleetwood Mac, “Hypnotized” and “Miles Away”

Listening Booth — Fleetwood Mac, “Hypnotized” and “Miles Away”

Listening Booth, Music
Yesterday the sad news broke that former Fleetwood Mac guitarist and singer Bob Welch had died of a self-inflicted gunshot to the chest. He was 65 years old. This has been an especially bad year for deaths in the entertainment world. Just so much loss. But let's try to forget that for a moment and remember the great music Welch left behind. Here's a rare Listening Booth two-fer in Bob's memory. Both of these come from Fleetwood Mac's underrated 1973 LP Mystery to Me, which I've discussed on this site previously, and they were both written by Welch. There's the melodic, mid-tempo treasure "Hypnotized" and the harder-edged "Miles Away," both of which showcase Welch's talents in singing, songwriting, and guitar playing. Enjoy "Hypnotized" and "Miles Away." RIP Bob. Related articles...
Listening Booth — Storm Corrosion, “Drag Ropes”

Listening Booth — Storm Corrosion, “Drag Ropes”

Listening Booth, Music
If you're a fan of either Porcupine Tree or Opeth, you've known for  years of the great musical kinship between Steven Wilson and Mikael Åkerfeldt. They've guested, produced, or mixed on each other's band's albums, but only now do we get the first true collaboration between them -- the self-titled debut of the Storm Corrosion project. I've listened to the album several times already and it's utterly engrossing. It sounds little like Porcupine Tree or Opeth, which is a good thing. The only time you really get a sense of the other bands is in Åkerfeldt's guitar playing, which is reminiscent of Opeth's more mellow moments. Anyway, one of my favorite songs on Storm Corrosion is the first one -- and lead single --"Drag Ropes." I don't know how to describe it other than the lost soundtrack
“Headlong Flight” — NEW RUSH SONG!

“Headlong Flight” — NEW RUSH SONG!

Music
Let's just get down to it, people. "Headlong Flight" is the first official track released from the upcoming Rush album Clockwork Angels. And yea, verily, it rocketh quite hard. Behold! "Headlong Flight" via Rolling Stone. Love the fact that Rush brought back Nick Raskulinecz to co-produce, as he did a bang up job on Snakes & Arrows. Geddy, Neil, and Alex all sound as energetic as they have in at least 20 years. Looks like I need to set aside some money to see this tour.
Listening Booth — The Rolling Stones, “Mother’s Little Helper”

Listening Booth — The Rolling Stones, “Mother’s Little Helper”

Listening Booth, Music
Last night's excellent Mad Men episode ("Tea Leaves") featured Don Draper and Harry Crane's funny attempt to snag the Rolling Stones for a Heinz commercial. Based on the dialogue in the show, the concert seems to be from July 2, 1966. The Stones played that night at the Forest Hills Tennis Stadium in Queens, New York. Their latest single from the Aftermath album -- "Mother's Little Helper" -- had just come out that day in America, although it doesn't appear to have made the band's setlist. So here it is, Mad Men and Rolling Stones fans -- "Mother's Little Helper," featuring Brian Jones playing that distinctive guitar part on his Vox 12-string Mando-Guitar.
Listening booth — The Darkness, “Nothing’s Gonna Stop Us”

Listening booth — The Darkness, “Nothing’s Gonna Stop Us”

Listening Booth, Music
The thing about the Darkness is, it was hard to separate the sincerity of their music from the almost painfully ironic image they cultivated. Even so, Permission to Land was an excellent rock record. The follow-up LP, not so much. After that, the Darkness went dark for several years. They're back now, and their as-yet-untitled third album should drop some time this year. The first taste is "Nothing's Gonna Stop Us," a rousing, electric slab of hard rock. Justin Hawkins still has a great set of pipes, which is the key to the whole thing. But the tune itself is pretty damn catchy and fun, which is really all this band is about. Check out the video, and then download the song for free from the band's website.
Bruce Springsteen has a new song and I kinda dig it

Bruce Springsteen has a new song and I kinda dig it

Listening Booth, Music
I've made no secret of the fact that I am not a very big Bruce Springsteen fan, despite being Jersey born and bred. This gives me one advantage over Boss diehards, in that I can approach his new music with a fairly objective ear. This leads me to "We Take Care of Our Own," the first single from Bruce's upcoming Wrecking Ball album. To me, it sounds like the Bruce I know best. It's hooky and anthemic, as was his classic '70s and '80s material. But it also sounds modern, which is what keeps the song from sounding too overblown. And I gotta hand it to Bruce, he still sounds passionate and a little angry at age 62, which is more than most people half his age can claim. I may just have to pick up a copy of Wrecking Ball, which would be the first new Bruce album I've ever bought. It...
Listening booth — Van Halen, “Tattoo”

Listening booth — Van Halen, “Tattoo”

Listening Booth, Music
The day is finally here kids! It's the first song from a David Lee Roth-led Van Halen since 1996, and the first single for a DLR-led VH since 1984. From A Different Kind of Truth, it's "Tattoo." First impression? Well the video is clearly an afterthought so no point dwelling on that. As for the song, it's decent but not mind-blowing. It's clear that Dave had a hand in the arrangement and writing as the verses sound like his solo stuff, particularly from the DLR Band album. The rest reminds me of Balance-era Van Halen. I hope Alex brings it a little more on the rest of the disc, as he sounds rather plodding here. And it's still weird to not hear Michael Anthony singing those background vocals, but what are you gonna do? I'm still going to buy the super duper deluxe version ...
Album Cover of the Week: Space Age Santa Claus

Album Cover of the Week: Space Age Santa Claus

Album Cover of the Week, Music
This cover has made the rounds for at least a few years, but I just stumbled upon it this year. It's a delicious slice of mid-century Christmas cheer called Space Age Santa Claus. According to the entry on this 45 rpm single (on a FaLaLaLaLa.com post that is now only available through Google cache), "Space Age Santa Claus" is the A-side of this single (from Delhi Records, 1961), and the B-side is "When Christmas Bells Are Ringing." Both tunes were written by Ross Christman -- which sure sounds like a pseudonym to me -- and performed by the Hal Bradley Orchestra with Patty Marie Jay on vocals. I'm a little confused as to the perspective in this drawing. Is that a regular-sized Santa holding a really small tree? Or is the tree normal and Santa is just colossal? Because if it's the