Tag: Soda

Retrotisements — A Year in the Life (1967)

Retrotisements — A Year in the Life (1967)

Retrotisements
In past ad galleries I've typically stuck with a particular theme or product, such as holiday-themed ads or new car lineups. I'm going to try something new and product an ad gallery from a single year, covering a wide range or products and services. Basically, a sort of visual shorthand to see what someone would've seen in print or TV ads in a particular year. Think of this as a virtual department store of sorts. For the first edition I thought I'd travel back exactly 50 years to 1967. Let's browse! Automobiles Consumer Electronics Entertainment Fashion Food and Beverage Health and Beauty Household Goods Travel  
Vintage Coca-Cola Advertising, Pt. 1

Vintage Coca-Cola Advertising, Pt. 1

Advertising
For the better part of a century-plus, Coca-Cola has been one of the most recognizable brands in the United States and the world. This is in no small part to the almost incalculable amount of gorgeous advertising images used to sell Coke over the past several decades. From major print and TV ad campaigns to the most unassuming store displays, Coke has had their marketing nailed down for what seems like forever. In honor of one of advertising's greatest triumphs -- not to mention an American institution -- I present here the first of hopefully many ad galleries featuring great Coca-Cola images throughout the decades. This collection features ten signs and displays from the mid 20th century, each in various stages of completeness. Click on any image for the full-size version. ...
Auction Finds: Whistle Orange Soda Advertising Signs

Auction Finds: Whistle Orange Soda Advertising Signs

Auction Finds
Circa 1940s, here are two fantastic cardboard cut-out advertising signs for Whistle Orange Soda. Whistle, a Vess Beverage Company product, was developed by a Vess salesman named Charles Leiper Grigg in 1919/1920. Grigg went on to invent what became 7 Up. As far as I can tell, both Vess sodas and Whistle are still being sold. Both of these signs feature the well known "Thirsty? Just Whistle" tagline. The first one  in particular is just so spectacular to look at. For more auction finds, click here.
Beautiful Billboards #1: 7 Up Is Canvenient

Beautiful Billboards #1: 7 Up Is Canvenient

Retrotisements
Here's a really neat 7 Up billboard ad from the good folks at Duke University Libraries. It touts the soda in can form, and features a really fun typeface and mid-century style drawing of the sun. The one thing I'm not sure of is the date. Take a look: Based on the use of the "Fresh Up" and "You Like It -- It Likes You" slogans, I'd put this ad somewhere in the early to mid 1950s (not sure where "canvenient" fits in). If I knew the makes and years of the cars seen here I could narrow it down. But regardless, this is one nifty billboard spot.
Ads from the Open Road, Volume 1

Ads from the Open Road, Volume 1

Retrotisements
I don't really pay much attention to billboard advertisements while I'm driving, unless it's something fairly snappy or unique. And as much as I'd like to romanticize old billboard ads, I think the medium as a whole has been fairly bereft of great ideas. And if you think about it, it makes sense. You're only going to see a billboard ad clearly for what, four or five seconds? So it's all about economy of ideas and design. Anything too complicated and you either lose a driver's interest or cause a 20-car pileup. Neither is good for business. I'm not holding this group of classic billboard ads up as the best ever, but I think you'll enjoy them nonetheless. These are all courtesy the Duke University Libraries Digital Collections advertising series. I can't decide which part of...
Coca-Cola’s Contribution to the Civil Rights Movement of the ’60s

Coca-Cola’s Contribution to the Civil Rights Movement of the ’60s

Retrotisements
And now for a little advertising history lesson... The year was 1967, and the American Civil Rights Movement was at its zenith. After years of struggle to seek equality in the United States, African-Americans had won a series of stunning legal and moral victories. What they had not yet won, apparently, was the right to not be imitated by white people in advertising. Huh? Let me set the stage first. Here’s an ad for Coca-Cola that ran in the August 18 issue of Life magazine: OK, so what’s the problem you ask? Well, usually when a company wants to sell their product to different racial or ethnic groups, they use people from those groups. Like these Coke ads from black magazines in the same year: But apparently there was a severe shortage of African Americans with t
The ’30s and ’40s in living color, Part 2

The ’30s and ’40s in living color, Part 2

Ephemera, History
November 2009 seems like ancient history to me, but that's when I published part one of my look at some of the most interesting color photos from the 1930s and 1940s (as presented on Flickr by the Library of Congress).  I love looking at pictures like these because even with the most mundane subjects, seeing them in color brings them to life in a way we never could before (unless you were there I guess). These photos were all taken between 1939 and 1944 by the United States Farm Security Administration (FSA) and later the Office of War Information (OWI).  Just click on a photo to see a larger version. (Part 1 can be seen here.) Even in the '40s no road sign was safe from the scourge of graffiti.  Although as one astute person pointed out, the markings on that railroad sign c