Tag: South Carolina

The Naughty Springmaid Girls of Esquire Magazine

The Naughty Springmaid Girls of Esquire Magazine

Ephemera
Back in February I shared a cheesecake-filled gallery of advertisements for South Carolina-based Springmaid Fabrics, most of which featured racy illustrations of women and their poorly-concealed panties. What I didn't know at the time was that two of those ads actually first appeared as front covers for Esquire magazine. It's always interesting to me to see how illustrations like this get re-purposed for things like magazines, ads, or album covers. The first piece, "Protect Yourself" by Frederick Smith, depicts a trio of comely young lasses waiting backstage at a skating show. Here is the original work: (via South Carolina State Museum) Smith's illustration was first used by Esquire for their April 1946 cover, like so... (via Esquire) ... and was picked up by Springmaid Fabr
Photograph of South of the Border, 1970s

Photograph of South of the Border, 1970s

Photography
I can't even remember the last time I stopped by South of the Border, one of the premier tourist traps on the U.S. eastern seaboard. I'm thinking it was probably the mid-'80s, on a drive between New Jersey and Florida for one of my many summer vacations in the Sunshine State. It is, to say the least, an odd site on the highway between North and South Carolina. Here's a photo of how it looked on approach during the 1970s. Click for a larger version. Plenty parking in rear! Notice, if you will, a few vintage gas station signs -- namely an old Shell logo and the American torch logo, the latter of which has since been supplanted by the Amoco brand. There's also a sign for Phillips 66, which is as unchanging as ever.
Great Photo of a Vintage 1960s Burger King Sign in the Wild

Great Photo of a Vintage 1960s Burger King Sign in the Wild

Photography
I stumbled across this interesting black and white photo on eBay. It depicts what is otherwise a pretty ordinary street scene in North Charleston, South Carolina in the 1960s. But look closer, and you'll see what caught my eye: Yes sir, that is indeed a vintage Burger King sign on the right. Now if you recall from my fast food burger chain logo gallery, the king on top of the burger BK logo was in use from roughly 1957 through 1969. Given the look of some of the cars in the picture, however, I'm going to peg this from the mid-to-late '60s period. If only this were a color photo, that would be oh so sweet. But still, it's pretty cool.
Springmaid Fabrics, You So Naughty!

Springmaid Fabrics, You So Naughty!

Retrotisements
Using sex to sell merchandise is hardly a new tactic, but in the 1940s it wasn't a common one either. And yet in the 1940s and '50s Springs Cotton Mills, makers of Springmaid Fabrics, put out a series of ads that likely pushed every boundary there was in American marketing with regards to sex appeal. The Springmaid ads, clearly influenced by pin-up art, made use of double entendre (written by company owners Elliot White Springs) and liberal doses of voyeurism. The illustrations generally fell into one of two categories, with some exceptions: looking up a woman's skirt or seeing her panties fall down around her ankles.  That's about it. Most of the advertisements came with a short tagline such as "Defy Diaphoresis," "Protect Yourself," or "Perfume and Parabolics." My personal favorite is
I don’t need your Civil War…

I don’t need your Civil War…

History
Even if you're not a history freak like I am, you should take some time to acknowledge that today is a pretty big anniversary. Exactly 150 years ago today -- April 12, 1865 for the math-challenged -- that the American Civil War began when forces from the Confederate States of America (CSA) launched an attack on the Federal outpost of Fort Sumter in South Carolina. 34 hours after the battle began Union forces, under the command of Major Robert Anderson, surrendered to Brigadier General P.G.T. Beauregard's Confederates. Neither side suffered any casualties during the battle, although two Union officers died after a gun explosion during the April 14 surrender ceremony. Following the Union defeat President Lincoln called for 75,000 volunteer soldiers for 90 days, as the scale of the Sout...
A Loving Tribute to “Slave to the Metal”

A Loving Tribute to “Slave to the Metal”

Music
In the days before CD players, iPods and file sharing services became a part of everyday life (aka The Dark Ages), the mix tape was an essential part of a music lover's life. There were two varieties of mix tapes - homemade (for yourself or some girlfriend/boyfriend whose name you can't even remember anymore) and store-bought. Store-bought mix tapes (known in the industry as "compilations") were superior in two ways - they exposed you to bands you might have never heard before, and they didn't take five hours to put together on your crappy home stereo. During a road trip from New Jersey to Florida in the mid-'80s, I purchased my first mix tape at a Stuckey's in South Carolina. Or maybe it was North Carolina. No, it was South Carolina. Maybe Georgia. Anyway, being a proud metal he...