Tag: spy

Every First-Edition Ian Fleming James Bond Book Cover (1953-1966)

Every First-Edition Ian Fleming James Bond Book Cover (1953-1966)

Books
Ian Fleming's 007 spy novels aren't just some of the most fun stories in the entire genre, they also sport some outstanding book covers. So for reference and for your eyes only (yuk yuk), here is a gallery of every original Ian Fleming James Bond novel book cover, 14 in all. They were all published in Britain by Jonathan Cape between April 1953 and June 1966. The last two books were published after Fleming's death in August 1964.
Book report: From Russia, With Love

Book report: From Russia, With Love

Books
I've been a James Bond fan since I was a kid, when I rented just about every Bond film available (actually my mom rented them, but whatever) and spent countless hours absorbing them.  But for some reason I never got around to tackling any of the source material - Ian Fleming's Bond short stories and novels.  I guess I never figured there was a reason to dig that deeply into 007, even though I've developed a taste for spy novels in my adulthood. But during a recent trip to a used book store I spotted some older editions of a few Bond novels and decided to take the plunge.  So I've finally finished my first Bond book, 1957's From Russia, With Love.  It's Fleming's fifth Bond novel and became, in 1963, the second in the film series.  I think I picked a good one to start with. (more&hel
Book report: The Once and Future Spy

Book report: The Once and Future Spy

Books
Having recently read the magnificent spy epic The Company for the third or fourth time, I decided it was finally time to explore some of Robert Littell's other works.  So for no particular reason I picked his 1990 novel, The Once and Future Spy (which Mrs. Suit informs me is a King Arthur reference). While TO&FS is not nearly as engrossing or rewarding as The Company, it was fun and engaging nonetheless.  Without giving too much of the plot away, the basic story goes like this: A CIA operative named Wanamaker is running an operation (code name Stufftingle) that may or may not be officially sanctioned by the agency, but is confounded by a leak.  To find and stop the leak he brings in a retired and somewhat disgraced former Naval Intelligence officer, one Admiral J. Pepper Toothacher
Book report: The ODESSA File

Book report: The ODESSA File

Books
Having only ever read one other Frederick Forsyth book (his 1971 debut, The Day of the Jackal), I had high hopes for The ODESSA File.  And while it isn't quite the classic that his first novel is, it's a damn fine yarn just the same.  It did prove, without a doubt, that the greatness of Jackal was not a fluke.  Of course, his long and successful career proves that too, but I digress. The story takes place in 1963-64 and centers on a young freelance German reporter, Peter Miller.  Miller drives a flashy car, makes a lot of money, and sleeps with a stripper.  He knows little of the Nazi atrocities committed during World War II and, like many Germans of his generation, really doesn't want to know much. That all changes when, totally by chance, he comes into possession of a diary wri