Tag: St. Louis

Vintage Photo Wednesday, Vol. 37: Smokin’ Outside the Pool Room

Vintage Photo Wednesday, Vol. 37: Smokin’ Outside the Pool Room

Vintage Photo Wednesday
From St. Louis in May 1910 comes a scene you won't see much of anymore. The photo description from the Library of Congress reads as follow: "A Pool Room Branch (Chouteau & Manchester). These boys were playing pool and smoking in the pool room while waiting for papers. The smallest boy is 9 years old and sells until 9 P.M." Click for a larger version. Photo credit to Lewis Wickes Hine. For another shot from the same session, check out this Shorpy page. I love the smirk on the dapper gentleman standing in the doorway. His face pretty much says, "Yeah, I'm watching these young kids smoke, what of it? As long as I get my paper on time I'm fine and dandy."
Vintage 20th Century World’s Fair Postcards (1900 – 1940)

Vintage 20th Century World’s Fair Postcards (1900 – 1940)

Ephemera, Featured Posts
Getting to a World's Fair is definitely one of the items on my bucket list. But until I can attend one in person, I guess the next best thing will have to be to look at some vintage World's Fair postcards. The selection I present here spans every officially sanctioned and recognized fair and exposition from the first half of the 20th century. Due to the outbreak of World War II, there were no fairs held between 1941 and 1957. The next part of this overview (to be published later) will pick up with Expo 58 and run through Expo '98. Exposition Universelle (Paris, 1900) (via) Pan-American Exposition (Buffalo, 1901) Louisiana Purchase Exposition (St. Louis, 1904) (via Brenda) Liège International (Belgium, 1905) (via alanp_photo) Milan International (1906) Irish International
Moments in Olympic Infamy: Anthropology Days

Moments in Olympic Infamy: Anthropology Days

History, Sports
The first handful of modern Olympic Games would probably look a little strange to fans these days. Things weren't nearly as slick or organized in the olden days, and never was this more evident than the 1904 St. Louis Games. The Third Olympiad was already hamstrung by the fact that many European athletes couldn’t or wouldn’t make the journey to St. Louis, so only 12 nations competed (as opposed to 24 in the 1900 Paris Games). This left the United States free to go apeshit, and they proceeded to win 239 medals; Germany was next with 13. In fact, St. Louis only got the Games in the first place because they threatened to stage their own sporting competition to upstage Chicago, the city that had originally won them. So St. Louis got the Olympics, but relegated them to a sideshow for the