Tag: The Rolling Stones

Pop Culture Capsule — January 1-7, 1984

Pop Culture Capsule — January 1-7, 1984

Capsules, History
It's a brand new year, so what better time to look to the past, right? Well anyway, I'm going to do it and I hope you'll join me for yet another pop culture capsule. To start off this year's capsules, I'm taking us back 30 years and putting us knee-deep in the 1980s. By this point in American popular culture, the last vestiges of the '70s have been shed and we're smack dab in the middle of the Reagan Era. For those of you on Spotify, a lot of the tunes listed here are included on some of my Ultimate '80s Hit Collection playlists. Specifically, the ones for 1983 and 1984. Top 10 Movies 1. Terms of Endearment ($11.5 million) 2. Sudden Impact ($9.6 million) 3. Scarface ($5.6 million) 4. Yentl ($5.5 million) 5. Uncommon Valor ($5.2 million) 6. Two of a Kind ($5 million) 7. Th...
Album Cover of the Week: The Rolling Stones — Sticky Fingers

Album Cover of the Week: The Rolling Stones — Sticky Fingers

Album Cover of the Week, Music
It was on this day 41 years ago that one of the great albums in rock 'n' roll history was released. I'm talking about Sticky Fingers, the 11th studio effort from the Rolling Stones. It's memorable today not just for great songs like "Brown Sugar," "Wild Horses," and "Bitch," but for the classic album cover. As you might be able to tell from the picture, that's a working zipper on those pants. Apparently the zipper caused some problems for record retailers, but not for the reason you might think. What they complained about was that the zippers were damaging the records due to the way they were stacked together. Subsequent shipments of Sticky Fingers had the zipper undone a bit to minimize vinyl damage. As for the seemingly, er, gifted model for the album, it was not Mick Jagger. I...
Listening Booth — The Rolling Stones, “Mother’s Little Helper”

Listening Booth — The Rolling Stones, “Mother’s Little Helper”

Listening Booth, Music
Last night's excellent Mad Men episode ("Tea Leaves") featured Don Draper and Harry Crane's funny attempt to snag the Rolling Stones for a Heinz commercial. Based on the dialogue in the show, the concert seems to be from July 2, 1966. The Stones played that night at the Forest Hills Tennis Stadium in Queens, New York. Their latest single from the Aftermath album -- "Mother's Little Helper" -- had just come out that day in America, although it doesn't appear to have made the band's setlist. So here it is, Mad Men and Rolling Stones fans -- "Mother's Little Helper," featuring Brian Jones playing that distinctive guitar part on his Vox 12-string Mando-Guitar.
“Hope I die before I get old” — Do famous musicians really die young?

“Hope I die before I get old” — Do famous musicians really die young?

Featured Posts, Music, People
With her tragic and untimely death, Amy Winehouse became the latest member of a grim group -- the so-called Club 27, whose only entrance requirement is to be a famous musician and to die at age 27. The club also includes legends such as Jim Morrison, Janis Joplin, Jimi Hendrix, and Kurt Cobain. This got me to thinking -- is it really true that the brightest stars burn out the earliest? Or does it just seem that way because of our fascination with stars who die young? Curious, I decided to conduct a little research so I compiled a list of famous and influential dead musicians. Of course that list could be limitless, depending on your standards for fame and influence. I ultimately opted to use Rolling Stone's list of the 100 Greatest Artists of All Time, first published in 2004/05 and...
When is a band/artist past their sell-by date?

When is a band/artist past their sell-by date?

Music
Anyone who has seen a performance by a band that's been around for at least 10 years or so has witnessed the following - one of the members says something along the lines of "this next one is off our new album" and half the audience either sits down or heads for the beer lines. Once in awhile, the crowd will become openly hostile and start booing any new material (this happened to Genesis during their Duke tour). So when does this transformation take place? At what point in a band's career do fans stop being receptive to new stuff? Is there anything an artist can do to prevent this? I've seen Rush a ton of times over the last 17 years and they seem to do a pretty good job of it, mostly because they consistently feature new material in their set lists. But during the last show I saw...
Concerning my “music snob” credentials

Concerning my “music snob” credentials

Music
Inspired by Jess's brave admission that he hasn't seen some of the most popular movies ever, I feel the need to come clean myself. But for me, it's all about the music. Despite owning hundreds of CDs and having thousands of songs in iTunes, I know there are some pretty big holes in my collection. When it comes down to it there's just not enough time to listen to all the bands I'd like to, so some tough choices must be made. David Bowie - I know some of his biggest hits ("Space Oddity," "Changes," "Let's Dance") and like them all. Still, I never really bothered to dig into his catalog any deeper. I downloaded a 2-disc greatest hits set today and am checking it out, however. U2 - I remember really liking the video for "Sunday Bloody Sunday," which MTV aired about every 20 minutes ...