Tag: The Supremes

Album Cover of the Week: Martha and the Vandellas, Heat Wave

Album Cover of the Week: Martha and the Vandellas, Heat Wave

Album Cover of the Week, Music
Christmas is over, and we're almost into that part of winter where you think it's never going to end and you're already tired of it being dark by 5pm. So let's turn up the heat with this slice of vintage R&B -- from 1963, it's Heat Wave from Martha Reeves and the Vandellas, first released on the Gordy Records division of Motown. This is the biggest image scan I could find, although it's not of the original album. That can be identified by the Gordy label that should be on the lower left. Design-wise, Heat Wave is pretty uncomplicated but it's very appealing all the same. The white dresses (and gloves!) of the ladies strike a brilliant contrast with the flames. Design and photography credit go to Bernard Yeszin, who worked a number of other Motown album covers in the early '60...
Music from the Worst Album Covers — Devastatin’ Dave, “Zip Zap Rap”

Music from the Worst Album Covers — Devastatin’ Dave, “Zip Zap Rap”

Album Cover of the Week, Music
We've all seen at least one article showing the worst album covers of all-time. But what about the music? Should you judge an album by its horrible cover? Well in this series, we’re going to find out. Today we examine "Zip Zap Rap" by Devastatin' Dave (The Turntable Slave). Precious little is documented about the artist known to us only as Devastatin' Dave (The Turntable Slave). His sole legacy on earth -- according to the internet anyway -- seems to be a lone release, the "Zip Zap Rap" vinyl single. It was released in 1986 on the Superstar International Records label, a short-lived imprint out of California whose biggest artist was Scherrie Payne of the Supremes. The single cover and center rings offer little help in uncovering the identity of the man behind the bitchin' red
1974 Burger King ads offer a study in contrasts

1974 Burger King ads offer a study in contrasts

Advertising, Retrotisements
Here we have two 1974 Burger King ads, both from the same "Have It Your Way" campaign. They both feature BK employees wearing the same groove-tastic uniforms, and they were both shot at the same location. But see if you can spot the subtle difference in the way the two spots are produced and targeted. #1 -- Super Soulful BK #2 -- Super White Bread BK Now, crafting ads to appeal to a certain demographic is nothing new, so I'm not casting judgment here. All I'm saying is that if the BK from the first ad still existed today, I would eat there EVERY DAY. I would sit back, cram another Whopper down my gullet, and watch the Supremes-esque cashiers serenade me with their soulful voices. And I would be 300 pounds in no time.
“Hope I die before I get old” — Do famous musicians really die young?

“Hope I die before I get old” — Do famous musicians really die young?

Featured Posts, Music, People
With her tragic and untimely death, Amy Winehouse became the latest member of a grim group -- the so-called Club 27, whose only entrance requirement is to be a famous musician and to die at age 27. The club also includes legends such as Jim Morrison, Janis Joplin, Jimi Hendrix, and Kurt Cobain. This got me to thinking -- is it really true that the brightest stars burn out the earliest? Or does it just seem that way because of our fascination with stars who die young? Curious, I decided to conduct a little research so I compiled a list of famous and influential dead musicians. Of course that list could be limitless, depending on your standards for fame and influence. I ultimately opted to use Rolling Stone's list of the 100 Greatest Artists of All Time, first published in 2004/05 and...
Listening Booth – The Flirtations, “Nothing But a Heartache”

Listening Booth – The Flirtations, “Nothing But a Heartache”

Listening Booth, Music
For those not familiar with the genre known as Northern Soul, here's as good a track as any to serve as an introduction.  It's from the sadly overlooked Flirtations, a girl group that started as the Gypsies in 1962 before changing to the Flirtations in 1966.  In '68 they released "Nothing But a Heartache", which cracked the Top 40 in the U.S.  It really deserved better than that, as it's one of the best songs from that year. This was the biggest chart hit for the group, which in my mind is a legitimate rival for the Supremes (at least talent-wise).