Tag: United States Army

Photo Gallery: Memorial Day Army Parade, Washington, D.C., May 1942

Photo Gallery: Memorial Day Army Parade, Washington, D.C., May 1942

Capsules, History
Here are some cool images taken during a Memorial Day parade in Washington, D.C., circa May 1942. As this was the first Memorial Day since the United States military officially entered World War II it likely took on extra significance. I'm no military expert so I can't identify any of the units in these photos. I'm assuming they're reserve units, but I could be wrong. There's a few shots in this gallery of what was referred to at the time as a Colored unit. Photography credit goes to Thomas McAvoy for Life magazine. (Click on the thumbnail for a larger version.)
To Arms! A Gallery of War Recruitment Posters

To Arms! A Gallery of War Recruitment Posters

Ephemera, Featured Posts, History
In times of war, there are basically two ways for a combatant nation to fill the ranks of its armed services -- it can recruit volunteer soldiers or conscript (i.e. draft) them. The former is accomplished in any number of ways, one of which is the mass production of recruitment posters. As we approach our yearly Veterans Day remembrance, I felt a new gallery was in order, so here it is. Quasi-War (1798 - 1800) This is commonly thought to be a recruitment poster for the American Revolution, but the 11th Infantry Regiment (under Lt. Col. Aaron Ogden) referenced in the poster was not formed until 1798, when war with France loomed. For a full-resolution version of this image click here. American Civil War (1861 - 1865) Despite what you might see on Google, most Civil War re
Farewell, Corporal Buckles

Farewell, Corporal Buckles

History, People
America's last living link with World War I is gone. Frank Buckles, the oldest remaining U.S. veteran of the Great War, died yesterday at age 110. Buckles was one of only three remaining veterans of WWI throughout the world. Buckles, born in 1901, enlisted with the U.S. Army in August 1917 after being turned down by the Marine Corps and the Navy. He was only 16 years old but, like many of his era, lied about his age in order to serve his country. In fact, after being rejected by recruiters in his native Kansas, Buckles traveled to Oklahoma City and kept at it until the Army agreed to take him. He was one of more than 4.7 million Americans to sail to Europe as part of the American Expeditionary Forces. Buckles joined the First Fort Riley Casual Detachment and shipped out for England i...