Tag: Vintage Tabletop

Vintage Tabletop: Marvel World Adventure Playset (1975)

Vintage Tabletop: Marvel World Adventure Playset (1975)

Games & Toys
Straight out of the Bronze Age of comic books comes this cool Marvel board game from Amsco. Hell, even if I never got to play with the thing it'd be worth owning one just to have as a model. Look at the picture on the box and see what I mean: This thing is so cool I'm even willing to overlook the glaring grammar error in the list of locales. See if you can spot it: Baxter Building Daily Bugle Offices Peter Parker's Apartment Avenger's Town House(!) Dr. Strange's Mansion The Negative Zone Fantastic Four Air Car Working Elevator Secret Trap Door Here is what the original, shrink-wrapped contents look like: It's a little early for Christmas, but if you're reading this and want to know where to send one of these just let me know!
Vintage Tabletop: Wacky Races (1969)

Vintage Tabletop: Wacky Races (1969)

Games & Toys
For the first entry in my new series, Vintage Tabletop, we're going to take a look at one of the countless TV tie-in board games of the 1960s -- Wacky Races. It's based, quite obviously, on the 1968 Hanna-Barbera cult classic cartoon of the same name. Released by Milton Bradley in 1969 (the same year the short-lived series ended), Wacky Races is a 2-4 player game targeted at the 7-to-15 age group. It's a fairly straightforward dice racing game, and the object is to beat the villainous Dick Dastardly to the finish line with your racer. Or as the game puts it, "The players maneuver their crazy autos across the countryside tying to avoid the traps set up by the villain, Dick Dastardly." There are small cardboard cutouts for all the vehicles seen in the show -- the Boulder Mobile, Bu
Vintage Tabletop: Touring

Vintage Tabletop: Touring

Ephemera, Games & Toys
For the deluxe presentation of Touring, head over to the Touring page on the main site. In 1906, cars were still considered a luxury item in the United States, well beyond the reach of the common folk.  And yet two years before the legendary Model T ushered in the era of affordable automobiles for the masses, the now-defunct Wallie Dorr Company figured the time was right to capitalize on what was still a niche product.  And to do so they unveiled a new card game based on the expensive, newfangled horseless carriage - Touring. You probably haven't heard of Touring but you've likely heard of its successor, Mille Bornes.  The idea is the same, really.  Players are engaged in a race of X miles (the figure changed over the years), and can play delay/hazard cards to stop or slow down their