Thursday, May 28
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Tag: Warner Bros.

Vintage Movie Title Camera Art

Vintage Movie Title Camera Art

Featured Posts, Movies
Back in the day, before fancy computers and gizmos and whatnot, title graphics in movies were painted by hand. By real human beings. And somehow they managed to look fantastic. So now I present to you a gallery featuring a host of vintage title art graphics, most of which date from the 1950s and '60s. (Click for a larger version.)
GFS Home Movies: Dames (1934)

GFS Home Movies: Dames (1934)

Movies
I have made no secret of the fact that I don't care for movie musicals. But I think what I'm discovering over the years is that there's a certain type of musical I don't like. I can't put my finger on it yet, but there has to be some sort of connection between the musicals I do like -- Chicago, Singin' in the Rain, and now Dames. I came across Dames (Warner Bros., 1934) while researching a piece of Popdose on the Flamingos' version of "I Only Have Eyes for You." Turns out that the song -- composed by Harry Warren and Al Dubin -- was introduced in Dames as one of the film's showpiece musical numbers. And man, what a showpiece it is! More on that in a bit. (more…)
Get to Know… Seals & Crofts

Get to Know… Seals & Crofts

Featured Posts, Music
There was once a time when the term "soft rock" wasn't used as a pejorative, but that was long before I started listening to music. These days it's just lazy music critic/fan shorthand for "boring" or "bland." Seals & Crofts often gets trotted out as one of the textbook examples of the bad kind of soft rock, and in all honesty it's not entirely undeserved. But for a time in the 1970s, they were among the finest purveyors of pop music in America -- regardless of label. If any act from the era deserves to have their legacy re-evaluated, it's the duo of Jim Seals and Dash Crofts. So that's what this edition of "Get to Know..." will set out to do. I hope by the end you'll agree with me that just because music is soft doesn't mean it's not good. (Previous editions of this series c...
Trailer Trash — Straw Dogs, Real Steel, and Happy Feet Two

Trailer Trash — Straw Dogs, Real Steel, and Happy Feet Two

Movies
I don’t have time to go to the movies much any more. So instead I’m going to just review some new and upcoming films based solely on their trailers. Because let’s face it, most movies only have about two or three minutes’ worth of good material anyway. Straw Dogs Well now doesn't this look perfectly life-affirming? Kids, the moral of the story here is that no good can ever come from having a hot wife (Kate Bosworth in this case) and then moving into a secluded house in a hick town with said wife. You'd think James Marsden would know better, since this is almost the same thing that happened in the original 1971 film starring Dustin Hoffman. (more…)
Album cover of the week: 1984

Album cover of the week: 1984

Album Cover of the Week, Music
Call it 1984 or call it MCMLXXXIV-- Van Halen's sixth album is one of the great achievements in rock for the entire decade of the 1980s. It also happens to sport a pretty badass front cover: The band's original vision for the 1984 cover involved four dancing, chrome women. The artist that Warner Bros. wanted to commission for the cover, Margo Nahas, declined the job as it was too complex. Her portfolio found its way to Van Halen however, and when they stumbled upon a painting of hers -- featuring an angel baby smoking a cigarette -- they knew that was what they wanted for 1984. The angel, who was rumored to be David Lee Roth as a child, is actually modeled after Carter Helm, the son of one of Nahas's friends. She styled his hair with some "goop" and gave him some candy cigarettes...
New Adventures in Hi-Fi: My Journey Into R.E.M., Part 4

New Adventures in Hi-Fi: My Journey Into R.E.M., Part 4

Music
When I started this series I honestly had no idea R.E.M. was on the threshold of releasing yet another studio album, Collapse Into Now. And as much as I would love to check out the new album, I think I'm going to hold off for a bit. I'd like to continue down the path I started in order to get a better perspective of their output so I can approach the new record with more than an outsider's mindset (unlike what I had when I reviewed Accelerate). We're up to album number five, Document. It's the last studio disc R.E.M. released on the I.R.S. label, and it is the group's first major commercial hit. My first thought as "Finest Worksong" got underway -- HELLO big rock production! My second thought -- Hey, so that's what Michael Stipe sounds like when he faces the microphone! Document ...