Tag: Washington D.C.

Film at 11: A Gallery of Vintage TV News Program Ads

Film at 11: A Gallery of Vintage TV News Program Ads

Ephemera, TV & Radio
Sometimes I know that a post I'm putting together is destined to get 20 views if I'm lucky. But I have to follow my muse wherever she may lead me, and today she leads me to TV newsrooms across the country. I can't say exactly why, but I find these old advertisements for network TV news programs to be just so... quaint? Charming? I don't quite know how to put it. I just love how much these ads convey what it must have been like to watch the news back in the day -- not slick in the least. Just a bunch of square white men (and sometimes white women) reading the day's events. And now the news of the 1950s, '60s, and '70s...  
Vintage Photo Wednesday, Vol. 26: Rocket Ship Prize, 1954

Vintage Photo Wednesday, Vol. 26: Rocket Ship Prize, 1954

Vintage Photo Wednesday
This week I take a break from my New Jersey-centric photos to feature a pair of really cool images from Life magazine. They were taken in Washington, D.C. by noted Life photog Yale Joel in 1954, although I've been unable to determine when or if they actually ran in the magazine. From what I can gather, some lucky boy won a contest involving a rocket ship. I'm not sure what he did to win it -- dress up and send in a picture or write an essay perhaps. But the rocket rolled into town on the back of a trailer, and quite a crowd turned out to see it. I'm guessing this is the kid who won the contest, all decked out in his space jumpsuit and homemade helmet. Looks like a Timmy or a Johnny. The photo description page says this about this spectacular shot, which could only have com...
Vintage Photo Wednesday, Vol. 21: New York Santa & Mobile Xmas Post Office

Vintage Photo Wednesday, Vol. 21: New York Santa & Mobile Xmas Post Office

Vintage Photo Wednesday
Sorry for the dearth of activity around these parts lately, it's been a hectic holiday season. To make it up to you I'm doubling your vintage photograph pleasure this week! Up first is a familiar site -- Santa Claus collecting donations for the less fortunate on a street corner, circa the early 1910s. This is from the Library of Congress's Bain News Service collection. Click for a larger version. The sign on the faux chimney reads, in part, "Volunteers of America -- Ballington Booth Christmas Dinners." According to Wikipedia, Ballington Booth was an officer in the Salvation Army. His parents, William and Catherine Booth, founded the Salvation Army in 1865. Booth and his wife Maud left the Salvation Army in the late 19th century and started their own charity organization -- God
Photo Gallery: Memorial Day Army Parade, Washington, D.C., May 1942

Photo Gallery: Memorial Day Army Parade, Washington, D.C., May 1942

Capsules, History
Here are some cool images taken during a Memorial Day parade in Washington, D.C., circa May 1942. As this was the first Memorial Day since the United States military officially entered World War II it likely took on extra significance. I'm no military expert so I can't identify any of the units in these photos. I'm assuming they're reserve units, but I could be wrong. There's a few shots in this gallery of what was referred to at the time as a Colored unit. Photography credit goes to Thomas McAvoy for Life magazine. (Click on the thumbnail for a larger version.)
Interesting stuff I now know thanks to Wikipedia (Vol. 1)

Interesting stuff I now know thanks to Wikipedia (Vol. 1)

Listcruft
Sherlock Holmes has an older brother, and his name is Mycroft. At 727 feet, the Renaissance Center is the tallest building in Michigan (the Empire State Building, by comparison, is 1,250 feet). Geraldine Doyle is the model for the iconic WWII "We Can Do It!" poster, but didn't even know it until 1984. Gargoyle originates from the French word gargouille, originally "throat" or "gullet". California currently has 53 congressional districts in the US House of Representatives, the most in the country. Alaska, Delaware, Montana, North Dakota, South Dakota, Vermont, and Wyoming each have one. Washington D.C. has one non-voting delegation. The Persian word for snow is rendered in English as barf, and is a product line of soaps in Iran.
Send me a postcard, drop me a line…

Send me a postcard, drop me a line…

Ephemera
The postcard has become a lost art; a quaint relic of the past. Oh sure, you can still find quantities of them in those spinning metal racks in any airport gift shop. But who really uses them for their intended purpose anymore? Quick – how much postage does it take to send a postcard in the US? Exactly. I came across these postcards at an antiques show a few years ago. Sure, I like to look at all the nice antique furniture and jewelry. And the old books and china are nice. But postcards are where you can really get a glimpse into the past. And since they’re not old letters, you don’t feel like you’re prying. Of course, I like old postcards for more esoteric reasons. I love looking at the cars, the architecture, the outfits and even the old fonts and signs. So many people use the word