Tag: West Germany

Listening Booth — Rush at Stadhalle, Offenbach, Germany (May 28, 1979)

Listening Booth — Rush at Stadhalle, Offenbach, Germany (May 28, 1979)

Listening Booth, Music
I can't believe I didn't think of this sooner, but it's high time I posted a Rush show on this site for the first time. After all, they finally made it into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, so it only seems right. And so inspired by my friends at Addicted to Vinyl sharing an excellent concert from the band's first album tour, I'm sharing one of favorites. This concert was recorded at the Stadhalle in Offenbach, West Germany on May 28, 1979 -- the second-to-last date on the Hemispheres tour. It goes by several names, but the copy I have is called Black Forest. It's a fantastic soundboard recording and the band is, as usual, on fire. Of note is that the entire "Hemispheres" suite is played, as is all of  "2112." Some of the transitions are rather abrupt, but otherwise this is an extreme
Retrotisements: Halloween (1978) U.S. and Foreign Movie Posters

Retrotisements: Halloween (1978) U.S. and Foreign Movie Posters

Featured Posts, Retrotisements
This piece originally ran in October 2008. I've republished it because, really, this should run annually. But to show I'm not just being lazy, I've added posters from Denmark and Italy below! October 25 marks a momentous day in horror history — the 30th anniversary of the release of John Carpenter's slasher classic Halloween.  While it certainly wasn't the first horror film on the block, it is one of the best and most influential. I and many other fans of classic horror consider it to be part of the holy trinity of the genre, alongside Friday the 13th (1980) and A Nightmare on Elm Street (1984). In retrospect, it seems like such a simple concept that it's hard to believe it hadn't been fully explored before. A psychopath is on the loose in the streets of a quiet, suburban town (Haddo
10 Things You Probably Didn’t Know About Kiss

10 Things You Probably Didn’t Know About Kiss

Featured Posts, Music
It's been nearly 40 years since Gene Simmons, Paul Stanley, Ace Frehley, and Peter Criss put greasepaint on their faces and took the stage as Kiss for the first time. Since then they've amassed 24 gold albums in the United States, took the makeup off, got a bunch of new members, put the makeup back on, and toured seemingly in perpetuity. In those four decades a lot of facts, rumors, and myths about Kiss have circulated. Of course the diehard members of the Kiss Army usually know what's what, but for everyone else, here are ten things you probably didn't know about Kiss. 10. Katey Sagal was a backup singer on Gene Simmons' 1978 solo album. Before she gained fame with American television audiences for her portrayals of Peg Bundy (Married... with Children) and later Leela (Fu...
Vintage View-Master: Germany (Nations of the World series), reel 1

Vintage View-Master: Germany (Nations of the World series), reel 1

Ephemera
My recent trip to Cape Cod yielded an unexpected treasure from a local flea market -- a large stash of vintage View-Master reels. Longtime readers of this site will have seen my postings of New Jersey and New York View-Master slides from the 1950s. Up next we hop on a plane (or boat) and head over to Europe to pay a visit to Germany of the early 1960s. Or at least I'm guessing it's the early 1960s. There's no date printed on the reels or the booklet but the latter mentions the Berlin Wall, which was built in 1961. Further, these reels were published by Sawyer's back when they owned View-Master, which was true until they were acquired by the General Aniline & Film (GAF) Corporation in 1966. So there you go. So let's get going already. Here's the first of three reels depicting Germ...
Album cover of the week: Wiegenlied

Album cover of the week: Wiegenlied

Album Cover of the Week, Music
Courtesy of the excellent Arkadin's Ark music blog comes one of the strangest and most disturbing covers I've featured in this series.  It's a 1977 release from German jazz big shot Klaus Lenz and his band.  It's called Wiegenlied (translated to Lullaby), and it was the final album Lenz recorded in East Germany, which he left the following year to go to West Germany. Ah, so quintessentially German, eh?  I'm willing to bet there's all sorts of meaning behind the imagery here, but I have a feeling knowing it would be even more disturbing.