Tag: World War I

Here’s a Terrifying Popular Mechanics Magazine Cover from World War I

Here’s a Terrifying Popular Mechanics Magazine Cover from World War I

Ephemera, History
I find images and illustrations from World War I to be more frightening on average than almost anything -- the Holocaust excepted -- from World War II. There's something morbidly fascinating about the weaponry used in that conflict. It certainly was new and cutting edge for its time, but looks curiously antique now. It gives drawings like this one from the July 1915 issue of Popular Mechanics all the more sinister. It showcases a German soldier wearing an oil tank with a mask and goggles, which can all be used for just one thing: shooting liquefied fire at his enemies. And just to complete the look, he's got a service pistol at the ready. This sort of military ensemble would probably be called steampunk now, if it weren't so cruel in its very design. I suppose I shouldn't be s...
Memorial Day Poster, 1917

Memorial Day Poster, 1917

History
Sadly, we know all too well that the list of wars in which American soldiers died hardly stopped at 1898 (Spanish-American War) or 1917 (World War I). Nevertheless, this day we remember their bravery. This Memorial Day poster really is a lovely piece of work and I'd love to know who illustrated it. (source)
Retrotisements: Sanka Coffee Edition

Retrotisements: Sanka Coffee Edition

Retrotisements
I've been known to enjoy some decaffeinated coffee from time to time, but I just can't see making it a regular thing. But for those who love the taste but can't handle the buzz, I guess it's good Sanka is around. The Sanka brand came out of France in the early 20th century, and its name is derived from the French words for "without caffeine," or "sans caféine." As history tells it, the credit for decaf goes to a team of German researchers led by Ludwig Roselius. In 1914, Roselius founded his own company, called Kaffee Hag Corporation, in New York. When Kaffee Hag was confiscated during World War I -- sorry, Germans! -- and sold to an American firm, Roselius lost not only his company, but also the American trademark rights to the name. To re-establish his product, he began to use the
To Arms! A Gallery of War Recruitment Posters

To Arms! A Gallery of War Recruitment Posters

Ephemera, Featured Posts, History
In times of war, there are basically two ways for a combatant nation to fill the ranks of its armed services -- it can recruit volunteer soldiers or conscript (i.e. draft) them. The former is accomplished in any number of ways, one of which is the mass production of recruitment posters. As we approach our yearly Veterans Day remembrance, I felt a new gallery was in order, so here it is. Quasi-War (1798 - 1800) This is commonly thought to be a recruitment poster for the American Revolution, but the 11th Infantry Regiment (under Lt. Col. Aaron Ogden) referenced in the poster was not formed until 1798, when war with France loomed. For a full-resolution version of this image click here. American Civil War (1861 - 1865) Despite what you might see on Google, most Civil War re
Photo Gallery: World War I in Color

Photo Gallery: World War I in Color

Featured Posts, History, Photography
If there is one conflict that did more than any other to forever vanquish the notion of warfare as a noble and brave pursuit, it was World War I. The Great War, as it was widely referred to until World War II, had an deep and lasting psychological impact on not just the combatants, but on society in general. It was the first war to be fought with mass-produced, mechanized tools of destruction such as tanks, war planes, U-boats, flamethrowers, and cannons of enormous size and range. The lasting images of World War I have been almost entirely in bleak, grainy black and white, which have only served to enhance the images of death and despair. But there exists film and photographs in color that allow us to view World War I as more real and something almost contemporary. Even the most mundan...
Farewell, Corporal Buckles

Farewell, Corporal Buckles

History, People
America's last living link with World War I is gone. Frank Buckles, the oldest remaining U.S. veteran of the Great War, died yesterday at age 110. Buckles was one of only three remaining veterans of WWI throughout the world. Buckles, born in 1901, enlisted with the U.S. Army in August 1917 after being turned down by the Marine Corps and the Navy. He was only 16 years old but, like many of his era, lied about his age in order to serve his country. In fact, after being rejected by recruiters in his native Kansas, Buckles traveled to Oklahoma City and kept at it until the Army agreed to take him. He was one of more than 4.7 million Americans to sail to Europe as part of the American Expeditionary Forces. Buckles joined the First Fort Riley Casual Detachment and shipped out for England i...
Interesting stuff I now know thanks to Wikipedia (Vol. 4)

Interesting stuff I now know thanks to Wikipedia (Vol. 4)

Listcruft
For those new to this series, the premise of this is simple.  I just use the Random Article link on Wikipedia (happy 10th anniversary!) and see if anything good comes up.  More often than not, nothing does.  Here we go! American actress Louan Gideon, whose most notable work was on the Nickelodeon series The Secret World of Alex Mack, has had a host of other memorable roles such as Woman, Grieving Woman, Saleswoman, and Hostess.  But I remember her best from the Seinfeld episode "The Millennium", when she played the speed-dial obsessed stepmother Mrs Hamilton. The Stock Exchange Luncheon Club was a members-only dining club situated on the seventh floor of the New York Stock Exchange in Manhattan.  It opened in 1898 and closed in 2006.  They admitted their first African-American membe
America the Brave: A Selection of Veterans Day Images

America the Brave: A Selection of Veterans Day Images

History
This post was originally published on Veterans Day 2008, and has proven to be one of my more popular entries.  So I'm bringing it back as my small tribute for this year. Originally known as Armistice Day, the first Veterans Day was celebrated on November 11, 1938 -- the 20th anniversary of the effective end of World War I.  Starting in 1954 the scope of the holiday was expanded to commemorate all those who had fought and served for the United States. I don't have any stirring essays in me, so my small tribute to our armed forces is this collection of images portraying the history of major American military conflict.  Thank you all for your service! American Revolutionary War (1775–1783) The Battle of Trenton (December 26, 1776) was a turning point in the American Revo
This Week in History! (February 22-28)

This Week in History! (February 22-28)

History
*February 23, 1927: The Federal Radio Commission (precursor to today's FCC) is created with the passage of the Radio Act of 1927.   President Calvin Coolidge urges the Commission to execute their duties with "all urgent haste", as Howard Stern's first show is only 50 years away. *February 25, 1964: A 22-year-old Olympic champion upstart by the name of Cassius Clay defeats heavyweight boxing champion Sonny Liston by TKO.  Clay changed his name to Muhammad Ali a week later, but I don't care.  His momma name him Clay, I'm gonna call him Clay. *February 24, 1988: With their 8-0 verdict in Hustler Magazine, Inc. v. Falwell, the United States Supreme Court rules that public figures cannot sue for being made the subject of satire.  The decision clears the final obstacle in the path of Larry