Tag: World’s Fair

Happy National Donut Day!

Happy National Donut Day!

Retrotisements
For National Donut Day (or National Doughnut Day if you please), here's a pair of lovely vintage donut ads. Up first is a lovely Mayflower Downyflake specimen from 1939, tying their donuts to that year's World's Fair in New York. And the second treat -- because who can eat just one? -- is this Mister Donut print ad from 1966. I wonder if that coupon is still any good?
Gorgeous American Airlines 1964-65 World’s Fair Poster

Gorgeous American Airlines 1964-65 World’s Fair Poster

Ephemera
I don't think I need many words with this, other than a brief description. This is a travel poster commissioned by American Airlines, and drawn by Henry Bencrathy, for the 1964-65 New York World's Fair. There's not much else to say other than that this is a stunner. Wow. Quite obviously, the focal point of this poster is the Unisphere, which I just happen to have visited recently as part of a trip to the site of the New York State Pavilion. (More great vintage ephemera awaits!)
The New York State Pavilion Gets Its Day in the Sun

The New York State Pavilion Gets Its Day in the Sun

Featured Posts, Mental Debris
I was not born until a decade after the 1964-65 New York World's Fair ended, so I've only ever been able to experience it through home movies, photographs, and postcards. Having never attended a World's Fair in the United States -- the last of which was held in 1984 -- it's always been a little difficult to understand the spell that those events cast over millions of Americans in the 20th century. The most visible remnants of that once-glittering spectacle in Queens are the Unisphere, which sits a stone's throw from Citi Field, and the New York State Pavilion. The Pavilion, actually comprised of three distinct elements -- the Tent of Tomorrow, a trio of concrete observation towers, and the Theaterama -- has been abandoned since the 1970s, its metal portions rusting and its paint fading.
Vintage 20th Century World’s Fair Postcards (1958 – 1992)

Vintage 20th Century World’s Fair Postcards (1958 – 1992)

Ephemera
Back for more, eh? As the follow-up to my set of World's Fair postcards covering the first half of the 20th century, here is the second half. This set picks up with Expo 58 in Brussels, which marked the first World's Fair held after World War II. Expo 58 (Brussels, Belgium) Century 21 Exposition (Seattle, 1962) (via Drive-In Mike) 1964 New York's World Fair (via The Pie Shops) Expo 67 (Montreal) (via The Pie Shops) HemisFair '68 (San Antonio, Texas) (via zawleski) Expo '70 (Osaka, Japan) (via Duncan Brown) Expo '74 (Spokane, Washington) (via The Pie Shops) Expo '75 (Okinawa, Japan) (via World's Fair Photos) 1982 World's Fair (Knoxville, Tennessee) 1984 Louisiana World Exposition (New Orleans) Expo '85 (Tsukuba, Japan) (via World's Fair Photos) Expo...
Vintage 20th Century World’s Fair Postcards (1900 – 1940)

Vintage 20th Century World’s Fair Postcards (1900 – 1940)

Ephemera, Featured Posts
Getting to a World's Fair is definitely one of the items on my bucket list. But until I can attend one in person, I guess the next best thing will have to be to look at some vintage World's Fair postcards. The selection I present here spans every officially sanctioned and recognized fair and exposition from the first half of the 20th century. Due to the outbreak of World War II, there were no fairs held between 1941 and 1957. The next part of this overview (to be published later) will pick up with Expo 58 and run through Expo '98. Exposition Universelle (Paris, 1900) (via) Pan-American Exposition (Buffalo, 1901) Louisiana Purchase Exposition (St. Louis, 1904) (via Brenda) Liège International (Belgium, 1905) (via alanp_photo) Milan International (1906) Irish International
Moments in Olympic Infamy: Anthropology Days

Moments in Olympic Infamy: Anthropology Days

History, Sports
The first handful of modern Olympic Games would probably look a little strange to fans these days. Things weren't nearly as slick or organized in the olden days, and never was this more evident than the 1904 St. Louis Games. The Third Olympiad was already hamstrung by the fact that many European athletes couldn’t or wouldn’t make the journey to St. Louis, so only 12 nations competed (as opposed to 24 in the 1900 Paris Games). This left the United States free to go apeshit, and they proceeded to win 239 medals; Germany was next with 13. In fact, St. Louis only got the Games in the first place because they threatened to stage their own sporting competition to upstage Chicago, the city that had originally won them. So St. Louis got the Olympics, but relegated them to a sideshow for the
Say hello to Elektro, the Westinghouse Robot

Say hello to Elektro, the Westinghouse Robot

History
He's all but forgotten today, but at one time Elektro was king of all robots. He was assembled by Westinghouse at their Mansfield, Ohio facility in 1937/38 and made his public debut at the 1939 New York World's Fair. Elektro stood at a height of seven feet, six inches and weighed 260 pounds. 60 of those pounds were his brain, which was comprised of "48 electrical relays." At the Westinghouse Pavilion of the World's Fair, Elektro the Moto-Man demonstrated a wide variety of skills such as speech, counting, stand-up comedy, and of course, smoking! Witness the marvels of modern 1930s technology in this excerpt from the 1939 promotional film The Middleton Family at the New York World's Fair. "Stand aside puny human, as I enjoy the mild, refreshing tobacco flavor of Philip Morris!" ...