Tag: Clyde Hart

Sunday Jazz: “All the Things You Are” (feat. Slam Stewart)

Sunday Jazz: “All the Things You Are” (feat. Slam Stewart)

Music, Sunday Jazz
I first encountered the unique stylings of bassist Slam Stewart on the excellent Dizzy Gillespie album Groovin' High, which captures some of the earliest recordings of bebop ever heard. Stewart's solo, which combined his arco (bow) bass playing and singing, grabbed my attention right away. He typically sung his vocals an octave above his bass part, to great effect. Stewart was born in my home state of New Jersey -- Englewood to be precise -- 97 years ago this Wednesday, and died at the age of 73 in Binghamton, New York. He was never the most celebrated of bassists, although he did enjoy commercial success as one half -- along with Slim Gaillard -- of the Slim and Slam duo. The pair notched their biggest hit in 1938 with Gaillard's humorous "Flat Foot Floogie (with a Floy Floy)." Toda...
Album cover of the week: The Birth of Bebop and Blues

Album cover of the week: The Birth of Bebop and Blues

Album Cover of the Week, Music
While digging up information for yesterday's edition of Sunday Jazz, I came across this old jazz compilation from Remington Records called The Birth of Bebop and Blues (RLP 1031). This 10" LP contains seven songs, many of which feature legendary saxophonist Charlie "Bird" Parker playing with Clyde Hart's All Stars. They were originally recorded for the Continental Records label, and later transferred in various combinations to Remington in the early '50s. I don't have any info on the graphic design or illustration, but I can say that I've seen quite a few Continental/Remington covers and they are very cool indeed.
Sunday Jazz: Vintage Charlie Parker and Dizzy Gillespie for Memorial Day

Sunday Jazz: Vintage Charlie Parker and Dizzy Gillespie for Memorial Day

Music, Sunday Jazz
Memorial Day is upon is once again, and so for this edition of Sunday Jazz I'm offering up a pair of wartime-related jazz numbers. They're billed to Clyde Hart's All Stars and feature Hart on piano, but the true attractions were jazz immortals Charlie Parker on alto sax and Dizzy Gillespie on trumpet. Information on the recording sessions varies, but it seems that these tracks were laid down in New York City on January 4, 1945 -- just a few months before Hart's death from tuberculosis. They also feature Rubberlegs Williams on vocals. Listen carefully to his rather loopy performance, which sounds that way for a very strange reason. Seems Rubberlegs helped himself to some of Bird's coffee, which happened to be laced with Benzedrine. Yup, that explains a few things. So what's the Memori...