Tag: S.P.H.I.N.X.

Venture Bros. wrapup: “The Silent Partners”

Venture Bros. wrapup: “The Silent Partners”

TV & Radio
I'll get the unpleasantness out of the way right now - the Billy Quizboy/Pete White-centric Venture Bros. episodes need to stop for awhile.  Billy and Pete are not nearly as interesting as Jackson and Doc seem to think they are, and diving deeper into their pasts, their relationship, or their neuroses doesn't really make for compelling television. Oh yeah, and I didn't see a Monstroso-heavy plot coming.  Not sure they really know what to do with the character, outside of the deep voice and jokes about his size.  Isn't he really just a more normal version of Baron Ünderbheit, a character they ditched for a few seasons? (more…)
Venture Bros. wrapup: “Everybody Comes to Hank’s”

Venture Bros. wrapup: “Everybody Comes to Hank’s”

TV & Radio
When I first discovered the secret of Hank and Dean Venture - that they're merely the latest in a series of clones whipped up by their father - I was pissed.  Even within the kooky world of the Ventureverse, where henchmen die left and right, it seemed to devalue their value as people.  It made for some good sight gags (particularly the death montage in "Powerless in the Face of Death"), but felt empty otherwise.  I posted as much on Jackson Publick's blog, and he didn't take too kindly to the criticism. But I think what I objected to in truth was that having the boys as clones gave Jackson and Doc a sort-of Venture Plot Etch-A-Sketch, where they could simply hit Reset and still get to off them in increasingly gruesome ways. So when they removed that crutch at the beginning of this seas
Venture Bros. wrapup: “Pomp and Circuitry”

Venture Bros. wrapup: “Pomp and Circuitry”

TV & Radio
For the second episode of The Venture Bros.: Season 4.5, the action (and the comedy to a lesser extent) gets dialed back in favor of some really solid character development.  It appears to breeze by but on closer examination a lot took place.  Firstly, the boys are finally done with their bed-based education (via the "Nerd Pods") and are graduates.  Of what, exactly, we're not sure, as we see when Billy Quizboy attempt to play the role of guidance counselor. To nobody's surprise, everyone but Rusty can see that Hank and Dean are ill-equipped to take on the real world.  But really, does that make them any different than the rest of the cast?  Have any of these people ever held down a legitimate job?  Super scientist doesn't count, unless you really are one and not just saying it.