Tag: Verve

Sunday Jazz: Jazz at the Philharmonic, July 1944

Sunday Jazz: Jazz at the Philharmonic, July 1944

Music, Sunday Jazz
The historic Jazz at the Philharmonic (JATP) concert series started by Verve impresario Norman Granz debuted at the Philharmonic Auditorium in Los Angeles, California on July 2, 1944.  It was a star-studded affair, featuring legends such as Buddy Rich, Lester Young, Nat King Cole, Illinois Jacquet, Les Paul, J.J. Johnson, and others. The fascinating thing about the recordings from this show is they serve as an excellent document of the bridge period between the late Swing era and the dawn of Bebop. I've updated by Spotify Sunday Jazz playlist with some choice cuts from the excellent compilation album The Complete Jazz at the Philharmonic on Verve, 1944-1949. Additionally I'd like to share some photos of that first JATP show, taken by Life magazine photographer Gjon Mili.
Listening booth — Trombone Shorty, “Encore” (feat. Warren Haynes)

Listening booth — Trombone Shorty, “Encore” (feat. Warren Haynes)

Listening Booth, Music
Hot off the presses (or whatever the music equivalent of that is), it's the lead single from Trombone Shorty's upcoming album, For True. Here's "Encore", co-written by Trombone Shorty and the legendary Lamont Dozier, and featuring Warren Haynes (Allman Brothers Band, Gov't Mule) on guitar. Encore by knitstitchmedia For True (Verve Forecast) drops September 13. Here's hoping it's every bit as awesome as Backatown was. Related articles Trombone Shorty: New Album in Sept (jambase.com) Trombone Shorty rocks the Cistern (charlestoncitypaper.com) Another Day, Another Trombone Flamethrower (geekologie.com) Warren Haynes: Sept. Tour (jambase.com)
I come not to bury jazz, but to praise it

I come not to bury jazz, but to praise it

Music, Rants
I might as well offer my two cents on Terry Teachout's recent editorial for the Wall Street Journal, "Can Jazz Be Saved?", since so many others already have.  In it, Teachout beats the same funeral drum that countless other jazz pundits have for decades - namely that the already small audience for jazz is shrinking alarmingly fast.  He even offers as evidence some results from a recent survey by the National Endowment for the Arts. The survey results Teachout extracts present a gloomy picture for jazz lovers indeed- not only is attendance down, but the median age for jazz fans is fast approaching AARP territory (from 29 in 1982 to 46 in 2008).  He makes the case that jazz, in terms of its audience, is becoming the next version of classical music. This reminds me of the old joke about