Tag: illustrations

A Gallery of Amazing Disney Concept Artwork

A Gallery of Amazing Disney Concept Artwork

Movies
The animated movies produced by the Walt Disney company in through the 1950s feature some of the most evocative and memorable images of any films from the period, animated or otherwise. A large part of that brilliance is thanks to the work some of the industry's best artists. This gallery features two such artists -- Mary Blair and Eyvind Earle, whose visual imprint is evident in these paintings. Their work shown here served as concept art for many of Disney's most beloved motion pictures. Enjoy!
Jack Kirby’s 1973 NFL Artwork Is Fantastic, Trippy As Hell

Jack Kirby’s 1973 NFL Artwork Is Fantastic, Trippy As Hell

Football Friday, Sports
It's hard to believe now, but in the early '70s the National Football League wasn't nearly as stifled and humorless as it is now. As proof of that, I present these pieces of original, commissioned artwork drawn by the legendary Jack Kirby for the NFL in 1973. These fantastic illustrations were included as part of the October 21, 1973 issue of Pro!, the official magazine of the National Football League that was sold at every game, in a piece entitled "Out of Mind's Reach." They depict, among other things, futuristic versions of NFL players in action. I think my favorite one is for the Packers, who have somehow adopted an aquatic theme. Perhaps Wisconsin has warmed enough in the future to make that a practical move.
An Exploded View Drawing of Madison Square Garden, 1967

An Exploded View Drawing of Madison Square Garden, 1967

History
According to this Deadspin article, New York City has basically given the owners of Madison Square Garden ten years to find a new place to play. The arena, which is the fourth to bear that name, opened on February 11, 1968 on the site formerly occupied by the above-ground portion of Penn Station. Apparently New York wants to undo that architectural crime, and so here we are. Not to get all nostalgic or anything, but I thought it worth taking a quick look back at MSG IV's early days. Here's a neat exploded view drawing of the Garden from the November 1967 issue of Popular Mechanics. It shows the main areas of the building by function.
The 1959 Symphonic Phonographs Catalog

The 1959 Symphonic Phonographs Catalog

Ephemera
While on vacation in Cape Cod recently, I brought a wad of cash to my favorite used book store and went nuts. In fact, I didn't purchase one book. Instead I walked away with a healthy stack of vintage magazines -- everything from old issues of Family Circle, The Saturday Evening Post, and Better Homes and Gardens to random fashion and auto magazines. And this, the 1959 Symphonic Phonographs catalog. Within these pages lies a bounty of vintage turntable models, all with that special late '50s beauty. You've got your sturdy and fashionable portable players, like the Junior and Sophomore models seen here... ... and you've got hefty models that double as furniture, as was the style back then, like the Symphony. You really can't go wrong either way I suppose. I have no idea
Here’s a Terrifying Popular Mechanics Magazine Cover from World War I

Here’s a Terrifying Popular Mechanics Magazine Cover from World War I

Ephemera, History
I find images and illustrations from World War I to be more frightening on average than almost anything -- the Holocaust excepted -- from World War II. There's something morbidly fascinating about the weaponry used in that conflict. It certainly was new and cutting edge for its time, but looks curiously antique now. It gives drawings like this one from the July 1915 issue of Popular Mechanics all the more sinister. It showcases a German soldier wearing an oil tank with a mask and goggles, which can all be used for just one thing: shooting liquefied fire at his enemies. And just to complete the look, he's got a service pistol at the ready. This sort of military ensemble would probably be called steampunk now, if it weren't so cruel in its very design. I suppose I shouldn't be s...
Behold the Strange Beauty of the Metal Ballads Album Covers

Behold the Strange Beauty of the Metal Ballads Album Covers

Album Cover of the Week, Music
I can't tell if these album covers for a compilation series called Metal Ballads are serious or not, but they are 100% undistilled awesome either way. They were released in Germany between 1988 and 1991, before grunge made things like this look even more foolish than they already did, so I'm inclined to think that RCA Records didn't realize they were unintentionally goofing on the entire hair metal scene. But still, look at these things. You could take the title off these drawings and pass them off as the covers to some astoundingly bad romance novels. Ones that take place in a world where shirts are but a distant memory and only the tender, rocking ballads of the Scorpions will see you through another hellish day sharing body heat for survival. Oh and for the curious, I've included ...
Springmaid Fabrics, You So Naughty!

Springmaid Fabrics, You So Naughty!

Retrotisements
Using sex to sell merchandise is hardly a new tactic, but in the 1940s it wasn't a common one either. And yet in the 1940s and '50s Springs Cotton Mills, makers of Springmaid Fabrics, put out a series of ads that likely pushed every boundary there was in American marketing with regards to sex appeal. The Springmaid ads, clearly influenced by pin-up art, made use of double entendre (written by company owners Elliot White Springs) and liberal doses of voyeurism. The illustrations generally fell into one of two categories, with some exceptions: looking up a woman's skirt or seeing her panties fall down around her ankles.  That's about it. Most of the advertisements came with a short tagline such as "Defy Diaphoresis," "Protect Yourself," or "Perfume and Parabolics." My personal favorite is
These 1980s Star Trek Illustrations Are My Favorite Things Ever

These 1980s Star Trek Illustrations Are My Favorite Things Ever

Funny Stuff, Internet
Sometimes, my friends, fate smiles upon you. Such was the case for me recently when I stumbled upon a series of 1980s Star Trek illustrations in chalk pastel, some of which I will now share with you. Credit for these goes to artist Doug Little, who apparently produced these for commemorative posters around the time of Star Trek II: The Wrath of Khan. Enough chit chat, let's boldly go. By the way, I've saved the best for last. Awww. Posing for the sweetest prom photo I've ever seen are Dr. McCoy and the salt creature from the Star Trek: The Original Series episode "The Man Trap." Yes, this is Khan and Gonzo. And Gonzo is holding a yo-yo that actually says, "Khan Is a Yo-Yo." Let that seep for a few minutes. Of course! All we had to do to figure out what was on the mi...