Tag: psychedelic rock

Album Cover of the Week: The Deviants, Ptooff!

Album Cover of the Week: The Deviants, Ptooff!

Album Cover of the Week
Iconic English musician and journalist Mick Farren passed away over the weekend after collapsing onstage at a performance in London, so I felt it was time to take this series out of mothballs and feature a great album cover he was directly associated with. It's from the debut album by Farren's influential psychedelic rock band, the Deviants -- Ptooff! Described in the liner notes as "the deviants underground l.p.," Ptooff! falls stylistically somewhere between garage rock and psychedelic rock. It's not as trippy as early Pink Floyd; it sounds more grounded -- mostly -- but also more sinister. Cover design and artwork on the album is credited to Kipps, a name I can't find referenced anywhere else. I know little of the Deviants, but it wouldn't surprise me to find out that Kipps is...
Album cover of the week: Twelve Dreams of Dr. Sardonicus

Album cover of the week: Twelve Dreams of Dr. Sardonicus

Album Cover of the Week, Music
There's a long list of bands that deserved to make it huge but just couldn't quite get all the stars to align in their favor. Case in point -- Spirit. The original lineup of this progressive/psychedelic/pop/rock outfit issued four outstanding albums before fracturing. This is the fourth -- 1970's Twelve Dreams of Dr. Sardonicus, originally released on Epic Records. There's just enough to make this image freaky, without it being over the top. I dig that distorted, fun house mirror effect. It's a little hard to tell who is who, but I'm guessing that's guitarist/vocalist Randy California in front with the hat. Behind him appear to be (l-r) Ed Cassidy (drums, percussion), John Locke (keyboards), Mark Andes (bass, vocals), and Jay Ferguson (percussion, keyboards, vocals). The photogra...
2010 – The year in recorded musical performances

2010 – The year in recorded musical performances

Music
I really need to find a way to turn music listening into a paying, full-time gig.  Because that's the only way I could ever hope to have time to take in all the good (and not-so-good) music that comes out every year.  Life really was much simpler when I didn't even want to make time for anything that wasn't by Kiss, Rush, or Iron Maiden.  So instead of approaching this as a "Best Albums of 2010" or "Best Music of 2010" list, it's more of a "My Favorite Albums/Music of 2010 That I Had Time to Listen To" list.  These are the albums that moved me one way or another this year, although obviously this is not (and cannot be) an exhaustive list.  I'm sure lots of really swell records got left off, but that's why there are other year-end lists on the internet, right? #10. Kanye West, My Beautiful
Album cover of the week: At War With the Mystics

Album cover of the week: At War With the Mystics

Album Cover of the Week
There are a handful of album covers from the Flaming Lips' discography worth of enshrinement as part of this series.  But for me it came down to a choice between their two best - Yoshimi Battles the Pink Robots and the ultimate winner, At War With the Mystics.  I was tempted to go with Yoshimi because I like the album more, but this cover is just so damn good: My internet sleuthing tells me the cover art credit goes to Dan Lazenby, although I'm open to corrections on that.  Regardless, I love the mood created by the bright, explosive imagery and funky title font.  It looks it could be the cover of a musty old paperback book you stumble across while browsing the oft-overlooked Fantasy/Sci-Fi section at a rummage sale or flea market. Right under the Warner Bros. logo it says "Stere
2nd Chance Album Review – The Cheerful Insanity of Giles, Giles & Fripp

2nd Chance Album Review – The Cheerful Insanity of Giles, Giles & Fripp

Music
Just one year before prog-rock titans King Crimson released their first album, two-thirds of that band released their first and last studio album as the erstwhile trio of Giles, Giles & Fripp — guitarist Robert Fripp, Peter Giles on bass and brother Michael on drums. Released in 1968, during the height of the Psychedelic era, The Cheerful Insanity of Giles, Giles & Fripp promptly sank into oblivion. But believe me, it's worth revisiting. If I had to surmise a reason why this album tanked, I'd say its oddly eclectic songs are a contributing factor. The album has a generous dose of cheeky, Kinks/Pythonesque humor, but most of the acts of the day were practicing a much darker and substantive form of psychedelia. Had this album been released even a year or 18 months earlier, it