Tag: Hanna-Barbera

Vintage Tabletop: Wacky Races (1969)

Vintage Tabletop: Wacky Races (1969)

Games & Toys
For the first entry in my new series, Vintage Tabletop, we're going to take a look at one of the countless TV tie-in board games of the 1960s -- Wacky Races. It's based, quite obviously, on the 1968 Hanna-Barbera cult classic cartoon of the same name. Released by Milton Bradley in 1969 (the same year the short-lived series ended), Wacky Races is a 2-4 player game targeted at the 7-to-15 age group. It's a fairly straightforward dice racing game, and the object is to beat the villainous Dick Dastardly to the finish line with your racer. Or as the game puts it, "The players maneuver their crazy autos across the countryside tying to avoid the traps set up by the villain, Dick Dastardly." There are small cardboard cutouts for all the vehicles seen in the show -- the Boulder Mobile, Bu
Hanna-Barbera Makes Me Want to Do Drugs

Hanna-Barbera Makes Me Want to Do Drugs

Funny Stuff, TV & Radio
And here I thought I had seen all the funky PSAs the '60s and '70s had to offer. I'm not sure how effective this 1970 public service announcement from Hanna-Barbera was at keeping kids off drugs, but even if it didn't it's still the coolest thing that bunch of hacks ever produced. Let's break this thing down, shall we? "Match"? I'd say that box has more than one, wouldn't you? Smoke 'em if you got 'em! (I do not endorse the use of illegal drugs.) That's either one hell of a doobie or the stink of patchouli on this kid is so strong it's formed a force field. We're almost one-third of the way through, and all this makes me want to do is get seriously stoned. (But seriously, I still do not endorse the use of illegal drugs.) Wait, is that some ki...
Note to John Kricfalusi: Enough already

Note to John Kricfalusi: Enough already

People, Rants
There was a time when I saw the name John K. and knew I was about to witness high-quality entertainment. For those who don't know him (or have forgotten), John K. introduced the world to the world of The Ren & Stimpy Show in August 1991. The first season of R&S is still revered by many animation fans as one of the finest ever for any cartoon. When it debuted it was seen by fans (if not by critics) as imaginative, frenetic, and the perfect antidote to a world of bland, predictable animation. But that magic didn't last long. By the time the decent (albeit uneven) second season started there were already huge delays (as long as one month between new episodes) and reports of friction between John K. and his bosses at Nickelodeon. Prior to the start of the third season in 1993, Kricf...